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New round of OZARK, watch trailer inside

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A new full-length trailer for Ozark season 2 is there.

The blue-tinted clip shows Marty Byrde (Jason Bateman, also directing) and his family getting deeper into the criminal underworld while authorities close in on them.

“These people that we work for, I used to think we different than them,” Marty laments as he tries to intellectualize his decisions to his wife, Wendy (Laura Linney): “People make choices, we don’t have to live under the weight of those decisions.” While Wendy assures their children, “We do not kill people.”

Another character, a woman you might have seen in Marvel's Jessica Jones, verbatim, “Don’t fuck my client, they’ll kill your children.”

Last season we were introduced to Marty Byrde and his wife, Wendy. Marty is a Chicago financial adviser who has been quietly laundering money for a drug kingpin. To escape his crime, after his partner is caught cheating the business, he has to take his family and move the operation to The Ozarks. There, he interferes with both a local drug dealer whose business he interrupts, and a clan of ruffians, led by their 19-year-old niece, who want his money, all the while avoiding a tenacious FBI agent.

At the Ozark panel at the Television Critics Association’s press tour in Beverly Hills, Bateman told critics the season 2 will be a level up. “The audience deserves an escalation,” he said.

He also was asked about how the show is often compared to AMC’s Breaking Bad. “Breaking Bad, we feel fortunate every time we hear that,” Bateman said. “That show can’t be touched. If we get even halfway to their quality and longevity, we’ve done a lot. That said, we’re not trying to replicate anything they’ve done narratively or aesthetically.” (via Entertainment Weekly)

Season 2 drops Aug. 31 on Netflix. The series is created by Bill Dubuque.

The official season description from Netflix reads:

Ozark continues to follow Marty Bryde and his family as they navigate the murky waters of life within a dangerous drug cartel. With Del out, the crime syndicate sends their ruthless attorney Helen Pierce to town to shake things up just as the Byrdes are finally settling in. Marty and Wendy struggle to balance their family interests amid the escalating dangers presented by their partnerships with the power-hungry Snells, the cartel, and their new deputy, Ruth Langmore, whose father, Cade, has been released from prison. The stakes are even higher than before, and the Byrdes soon realize they have to go all in before they can get out.

s2

About season one:

"There’s a lot of speechifying in Ozark – people talk in full, well-wrought sentences – but the writing is up to the challenge. It’s darkly funny, unflinchingly but not gratuitously violent, and it simmers with menace. You are unlikely to leave long between episodes one and two. Bateman is great as Marty, a quick-thinking, soft-speaking hustler knitting his life back together almost as fast as it’s unravelling, switching between crime and domestic drudgery. He orders his kids to stand watch over their motel room while he’s out – there is $8m stashed under the bed – before adding: “And I’d love to not have to turn the room upside down to find the clicker.”" (The Guardian)

"Created by Bill Dubuque, who blended financial services and more aggressive misconduct in last year's Ben Affleck thriller The Accountant, Ozark has elements of the regional thriller/country noir novels of an Elmore Leonard or Daniel Woodrell, but it has shockingly little fun with any of its genre trappings. And, despite an antihero prone to fast-talking and sarcasm played by a comedically dexterous leading man, there's very little humor, even of the pitch-black sort. Showrunner Chris Mundy worked on AMC's Low Winter Sun, an adaptation so full of cable-drama stereotypes it was mocked on The Good Wife, so perhaps it was inevitable that as episodes progress, there's a torture-and-misery-filled nihilism to Ozark so total that it's hard for any personality to escape. n addition to starring, Bateman directed much of the 10-episode first season and he's pitched both his own performance and the show's overall tone in a direction that's more morose and introspective than was necessarily required. Ozark isn't quite Bateman's Flaked, but Netflix is surely amenable to enabling its Arrested Development stars' mopier instincts between seasons." (The Hollywood Reporter)

Tags:   netflix, news, season 2, television, film news, Ozark

Related:   Breaking Bad, Ozark


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