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A movie about an iBOY, powered by Netflix

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I started watching Adam Randall's iBoy because of Maisie Williams (Arya of Game of Thrones) and stayed for the premise, and why not, for what seemed not to be the worst unfolding of said premise. The movie is based on a 2010 book by Young Adult novelist Kevin Brooks, best known for the nihilistic Carnegie Medal-winner The Bunker Diary. If you're willing to give this movie a try, do it with your critical thinking hat on, but allow yourself to be intrigued by threads of information that will most likely entertain.

iBoy's narrative is set up in UK and tells the story of Tom (played by Bill Milner), a boy whose only guardian is his grandmother (played by Miranda Richardson). One night, he walks from his apartment to Lucy's (Williams) home - a girl from school - in order to initiate some sort of romantic relationship, one presumes, but finds himself in a violent mess. Long story short, it ends with him receiving a bullet to the head. However, the damage turns out to be a blessing in disguise though by the series of events that follow it's hard to see it as such. The boy gets these super hacking powers because of the pieces of smartphone that now live in his brain, and, step by step, he tries to take down the criminal cartel that has been poisoning his community. A lot of people get hurt in the process, including the baddest guy of them all (played by Rory Kinnear). All in all, the story and the acting make for an entertaining one hour and a half.

But if you're looking for other point of views on the matter, check out the following review snippets.

"True to form, iBoy sees Brooks tackle the grimmest themes he can. Awkward teenager Tom, whose drug-addict mother died when he was two years old, drops by his school sweetheart Lucy’s council flat. On arrival, he finds her being attacked – and, it transpires, raped – by masked hoodlums. He tries to dial 999: they shoot him in the head, and the impact lodges a few shards of smartphone in his brain. For reasons the film doesn’t try to unpack in its 90-minute running time, these give Tom not only psychic internet access, but unlimited power over anything electrical (light bulbs, car engines, etc.).

Unlike the planet-wobbling histrionics we’ve come to expect from Marvel films, iBoy is a refreshingly small-scale affair. The film never looks beyond the walls of Tom’s downtrodden London estate, where he tries to bring down its network of small-time drug dealers. Rather than glossy action sequences and CGI explosions, the emphasis here is on dialogue and character. It’s a bold approach that the script struggles to pull off. [...] Maybe I shouldn’t be so surprised that a movie called iBoy is a little outdated. But it isn’t just the film’s understanding of technology that seems off; iBoy’s gender dynamics and its entire story structure both feel pulled from the ‘90s. At the same time, iBoy has little nostalgia for movies of that time, like Hackers and The Net, that made its existence possible. And without any camp or humor to go with its self-serious hacks, iBoy feels like it’s trying to understand something the rest of us figured out years ago." (The Telegraph)

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"Because despite iBoy’s assertions that it’s selling a futuristic kind of good vs. evil, it’s actually a pretty traditional yarn about a damsel in distress. The hero is a hackerman, but the villain is just a drug kingpin who’s interested in getting very rich. There’s potential here for a story about a teenager dealing with the moral questions of unlimited spy powers, but iBoy instead charts its course toward kidnapping, a gun fight, and redemption.

Maybe I shouldn’t be so surprised that a movie called iBoy is a little outdated. But it isn’t just the film’s understanding of technology that seems off; iBoy’s gender dynamics and its entire story structure both feel pulled from the ‘90s. At the same time, iBoy has little nostalgia for movies of that time, like Hackers and The Net, that made its existence possible. And without any camp or humor to go with its self-serious hacks, iBoy feels like it’s trying to understand something the rest of us figured out years ago." (The Verge)

And watch the trailer below.

Tags:   netflix, news, sci-fi, trailer, film news, iBOY

Related:   Game of Thrones, iBoy


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  • AntMan2018   239 posts
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